Hard wiring Cellink Neo (or any high current device)

cctrader77

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I am trying to hard wire the Cellink Neo (rated 9A, using 20A fuse) and had a couple questions. I am not an expert in electrical engineering so correct me if any of the stuff I stated below is wrong.

I have tested all my fuse slots and I do not have any empty ones that are ACC, thus I have to tap into an existing slot. I understand the process of how to use the add-a-fuse and the correct and safe way to insert it into an existing fuse slot. No issues there.

feedwire case.jpg

My question is would adding an additional 9 amps to the occupied fuse slot overload the wire that feeds into the fuse slot. Attached above is a diagram explaining my situation. My concern is that the "Feed Wire" in the diagram might not be rated high enough for an additional 9 amps. Correct me if I am wrong, but it is my understanding that using both devices would draw 26 amps, which is higher than the 25 amp rated "Feed Wire." For more information, here is a video detailing my issue - start at 3:05 (
).

Do you know if these "Feed Wires" are rated just high enough for the existing device to operate OR if the Feed Wire is rated at say 30 or 40 amps even for a low current device that uses 5 amps?

Do you have any experience or know of anyone who has wired the Cellink Neo(or any high current device) onto an additional existing fuse circuit(not an empty one)? If so could you share the make and model of the car as well as which type of fuse slot they piggybacked off of(amp rating, type of fuse - window, washer, moonroof, etc).

I realize my question kind of depends on the make and model of the car and thus may be tough to answer; however, any information is welcome. I drive a Honda CRV 2014 ex-l btw.
 

Nigel

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Looking at your diagram, unless you hold the horn on for more than 5 seconds at a time, the wiring will not have time to overheat so there will be no problem!

However the correct way to supply an additional high current device is to add an extra feed wire of the correct rating from the main fuse box where you have a 100 amp supply, or possibly direct from the battery, with an inline fuse near the start of the cable of the correct rating for your device. If you want it switched with the ignition then add a relay in your new feed wire which is switched by a fuse tap into an ignition switched fuse, the relay coil will consume only 0.2 amps so then there is no worry about overloading anything and your charging will not be slowed by voltage drops through inadequate cabling.

You could look up guides for adding extra spot lights or air horns, or any other device that uses a high current.
 
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cctrader77

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Looking at your diagram, unless...
I'll take a look into that, I'm not an expert so if it's too complicated I may not do it. But thanks for the info Nigel! You seem to be everywhere haha.
 

Nigel

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I'll take a look into that, I'm not an expert so if it's too complicated I may not do it. But thanks for the info Nigel! You seem to be everywhere haha.
Actually quite simple to do, the problem is always in getting the wires from the engine compartment where you have the power into the cabin, you need advice for your particular car on that issue. If I was fitting a large lithium battery I would much rather it be in the engine compartment anyway since in the unlikely event that it catches fire it would then not destroy the car.
 
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