Recommendations for dash cam battery pack with Street Guardian SG9663DCPRO?

TexasBuyer

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I really like my dual channel SG9663DCPRO. I would like the benefits of parking mode without having to hardwire into my fusebox. Are they recommendations for dash cam battery pack with Street Guardian SG9663DCPRO?
 

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I’ve had several buyers use a CELLINK NEO with the optional Cellink NEO unspliced 3-wire cable. You connect that to the 3-wires of the Street Guardian SGDCHW hardwire kit.
 
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wozzzzza

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if you dont want to hard wire, what will you do? just plug it into your cigarette lighter?? probably wont be very effective as battery will just end up going flat as it wont have enough time to charge up unless you want to try and remember to bring it inside to charge it all the time.
 

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The Cellink Neo when hardwired charges completely in ~45 minutes, otherwise it and all the other powerbanks take a few hours to fully charge. To get it's quick-charge capability you have to tap into a high-amperage circuit but almost all cars will have that easily available. If you plug the Neo into a ciggie lighter socket there's no advantage, as it then has only slow-charging capability ;)

Phil
 

Deacon

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To get it's quick-charge capability you have to tap into a high-amperage circuit but almost all cars will have that easily available. If you plug the Neo into a ciggie lighter socket there's no advantage, as it then has only slow-charging capability ;)
How high an amperage does it require? And I would imagine it can take a charge while still powering the cam, right?

If I were concerned about preserving my vehicle’s starting battery (I imagine that’s why these devices exist), I think I’d want it to be hardwired to an ignition switched accessory power source, so that during drives it can recharge off the alternator. I’m not sure how high an amperage typical passenger cars provide for switched power that they have sufficient overhead to add a circuit higher than the typical 15A fed to 12V sockets. If that’s required, I imagine the best case scenario would be a lead straight to the battery that’s controlled by a normally open relay, so it only closes and completes the charging circuit when energized by a small draw taken from a switched circuit. And if that’s the case, I’d be surprised if such a package weren’t already available from the manufacturer to hardwire it that way.
 

SawMaster

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The fast-charge function of the Neo requires 9A of current. It is correctly wired such that it charges only while the engine is running, and the cam fed by it still functions normally while driving. It's designed to be as much "plug-and-play" as the average person can do, so most people DIY it. If you don't feel you're up to the job any car garage or car audio shop can do it for you.

Some of us are discussing (and some are doing) much more capable cam-powering systems, but these are totally DIY and require that you have some knowledge of numerous things involved and the ability to do your installation safely. Sort of "advanced hobbyist level" or higher is required for this but not really that hard to do. I'm planning on a 20A system myself and hoping that come springtime I'll be able to do it as I'm also integrating some cam changes along with it. It's positively the best way for those capable of doing it properly and can give you all the parking time you can ever reasonably want for a price equal to or even less than devices like the Neo if you don't count the time it takes to do as part of the cost :cool: Having something like this done professionally will get costly though, which is why no such systems are available ready-made.

Phil
 

Deacon

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The fast-charge function of the Neo requires 9A of current.
So why would you claim that a 15A circuit for the 12V socket is insufficient? That circuit’s only job is to feed power to hungry consumer devices. If you use some other high-amperage circuit, something in the vehicle is already using that circuit; tapping into it to feed an additional high-draw load isn’t a great idea, and no amount of condescension will change that.
 

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Not my claim but theirs. The Neo comes with a ciggie-plug adaptor and a hardwire PS. If you use their ciggie plug adapter only slow charging is possible. If you hardwire into that circuit you get fast charging. Just the way they set it up to work- I have nothing to do with that. Look into the Neo yourself if you want to learn more about it.

Phil
 

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I think all of the dashcam batteries have / tolerate a faster charge rate when hardwired.
 

Deacon

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What if there were a way you could get all the switched power you could want, to feed your cam battery as fast as it can take a charge, to power all your other devices and chargers, etc?

Let’s say you have a switched fuse somewhere inside the cabin or under the hood. Tap that and run a small wire (like 18AWG, it doesn’t take much current) to trigger a relay whose power is fed directly from the battery through the firewall. Switched fuse is under the hood? Mount the relay under the hood somewhere, too. Fuse is inside? Even easier.

For work under the hood, if you’ve got ring terminals with heat shrink, use those to help prevent any moisture intrusion and corrosion of the wiring. Use Posi-Locks rather than butt connectors if you’re mounting a rely there, using a relay harness (preferred), or if attaching directly to the relay leads then see about grabbing some spade connectors with heat shrink tubing. If you don’t have any already handy and don’t feel like buying some, slide on your own marine grade heat shrink tubing on all connections under the hood. Always good to have a variety pack of decent heat shrink around. Here’s a great collection for $10...

https://www.amazon.com/gp/B071H5XC7C

To do so, get a simple normally open relay of sufficient amperage capacity. 30A is common and way plenty. It doesn’t hurt to be able to handle more than you’ll draw. Use a Posi-Tap or add-a-circuit to use that switched fuse to trigger the relay. Run power to the relay directly from the positive terminal of the battery, with an in-line fuse near the battery connection. Ground to any nearby chassis bolt (not the negative terminal of the battery), ideally one that appears to be acting as a factory ground point already. Now you’ve got all the switched power you could want.

Here’s a waterproof relay with harness that would work well for you. It’s $10. Or get a 5-pack for $25.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/B074QV54V1

And here’s a 5-pack of 12AWG water resistant fuse holders to use as the battery end of the connection. Again, use marine grade heat shrink tubing to protect all connections and terminals other than Posi-Lock brand stuff.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/B0002KR88A

Run a feed wire through the firewall (no need for a ground wire) to wherever you want it to end up. Then use anything from a simple power bus (with each fed lead having its own in-line fuse) to a fancy RigRunner style fuse block to supply power to all the things, either way grounded to a an appropriate chassis screw/bolt. Or just use some Posi-Taps sunk into that one feed wire, I guess :)

What size wire to use depends on how much current capacity you think you might want, and to some extent how long that wire is, though in this application it should end up being fairly short anyway, certainly less than 10 feet. Always oversize at least a little. Consider 14AWG the minimum. Here’s some decent 12AWG wire that should be sufficient (unzip the black wire and use it separately)...

https://www.amazon.com/gp/B01ABOPMEI
 

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Sounds like they’re setting it up based on the lowest common denominator type approach.
That's pretty much a "must-do" for things like this being sold on the wide open retail market where almost all the buyers will have no clue about what they're doing with Lithium batteries that are dangerous when misused. It's not hard at all to DIY something better, but then you're getting near the edge of the 'safety envelope' and it's up to you the be sure you stay within it ;) The knowledge is out there and easy to find, as are the parts one needs to do that with. And it you use SLA or AGM battery technology instead, the job becomes much easier to do safely :cool:

Which is why I won't openly discuss doing Lithium battery builds because people just do not understand that with them every aspect is critical, and you can't change anything to make it cheaper , simpler, or easier to do. Plus like dashcams, sometimes components change over time without notice being given so what I suggest today could be bad advice tomorrow :eek: You need deep knowledge to DIY Lithium builds safely and the only way I can be sure someone else has that level of understanding is to make them go get that knowledge. I can tell you what to do but I cannot make you understand why it must be done that way, and unless you understand that you should not be doing Lithiium builds :cautious:

SLA and AGM are much safer and much more forgiving of mistakes- those I will discuss. As your further post shows this isn't hard to manage at all. A simple unprotected system can be as easy as one DPDT relay, but it's not hard to add a pre-made LV cutoff to help the battery live longer, and you can even get temp-limit modules which wire straight in if your battery sees extreme temps where you don't want to be charging it. Charging is basically self-regulating with these types of batteries and they can in fact be set up in this manner with no safety risks as long as you watch that the charge voltage doesn't go high. In a properly functioning car charging system that won't happen :)

But this is getting off-topic and is being discussed on other threads, so getting back to the OP the best you can do right now is the Cellink Neo and if you need it the B124 extension pack. If you need more than they can give then DIY will be necessary.

Phil
 

Deacon

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SLA and AGM are much safer and much more forgiving of mistakes- those I will discuss. As your further post shows this isn't hard to manage at all.
We weren’t talking about trying to do battery management ourselves. I was talking about how to feed clean, plentiful power (without impacting your vehicle’s circuits) to a commercial battery power product from accessory switched power (eliminating the low voltage cutoff concern) that apparently requires at least 9A at 12V for the built in battery management system to switch into fast charge mode.

Personally, I know enough about managing lithium batteries and the occasionally sketchy reliability of components available to DIY it that I’d rather not do it myself at all. While pricey, I’ve had fantastic luck with Dakota Lithium’s LiFePO4 replacements for SLAs with built-in management systems. I’ve used one of their 10Ah units for nearly 3 years now as part of my 12V power and testing rig, and I have nothing but good things to say about it. I even used it to power a collection of 12V socket phone fast chargers at my wedding reception so guests wouldn’t have to worry about their phones dying. Worked great and as expected lasted many hours at sustained 13V+ :)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/B00JK06CK8
 
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