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What is JDR file format?

JDR file format is GNET SYSTEM invented file recording format. GNET SYSTEM developed JDR file system 12 years ago.
JDR files are the proprietary file system of GNET SYSTEM and are not compatible with general video players.

The file system has a function to prevent loss of recorded video. For example, AVI file system loses its data when an impact occurs in the middle of recording.
If an event is 10 sec and the device stops(or shut down, lost power) recording in the middle of 10 sec, AVI file system loses entire 10 sec record.
However, JDR file system records the length from the start to until the event happens. It doesn't loses entire length of data even if recording stops.


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.ts file format (transport stream) is becoming common now achieving the same results. Since .ts is thye language already used through the processor no change of format is needed and only about one second of vid might be lost at shutdown with .ts instead of the whole file.

What is the advantage with JDR? Seems like it's .ts only with a different name.

Phil
 
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.ts file format (transport stream) is becoming common now achieving the same results. Since .ts is thye language already used through the processor no change of format is needed and only about one second of vid might be lost at shutdown with .ts instead of the whole file.

What is the advantage with JDR? Seems like it's .ts only with a different name.

Phil
The .ts file format is a communication protocol for MPEG Transport stream, audio, video, and data transmission. When transmitting video, it is transmitted in packet units.
This format is widely used in digital broadcasting and is mainly used when recording HDTV broadcasting as it is. The highest quality video can be viewed (closer to the original) and is played in packet units, so it is not compressed and thus has a large capacity (HD video 1hour length is 9GB).
On the other hand, JDR files effectively store data, and usually, one JDR file is 71MB(2 min. length, 2130MB for 60 min. length) in size. When converting to MP4, the size increases to about 130MB. The .ts file is about x4.2 bigger than JDR file format.
 

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If the JDR files are not compatible with general video players, what happens if you need to provide a copy of the original JDR file to an insurance company, a law enforcement officer, an attorney, show it in a courtroom, etc.?

Also, if you need to edit a JDR file, even just to convert it to another format how can one do that if the file can't be opened and worked with in a standard editing suite?
 
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If the JDR files are not compatible with general video players, what happens if you need to provide a copy of the original JDR file to an insurance company, a law enforcement officer, an attorney, show it in a courtroom, etc.?

Also, if you need to edit a JDR file, even just to convert it to another format how can one do that if the file can't be opened and worked with in a standard editing suite?
Thank you for your question. The video player provided by Gnet System provides a function to convert JDR to MP4. If the court does not allow the converted file, you can use the video playback program provided by the Gnet System. The fact that the file can be played using a dedicated program is also proof that it is difficult to tamper with the file. I am sure an insurance company, a law enforcement officer, an attorney, and a courtroom will accept it.
 

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While i celebrate the unique in things and people, then it do make me a little apprehensive in dashcams, but at least you guys have a player and a option to convert so thats good.
I am not too worried ending up in a Danish court with dashcam footage, i cant even recall a traffic case going to court here.
 

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Thank you for your question. The video player provided by Gnet System provides a function to convert JDR to MP4. If the court does not allow the converted file, you can use the video playback program provided by the Gnet System. The fact that the file can be played using a dedicated program is also proof that it is difficult to tamper with the file. I am sure an insurance company, a law enforcement officer, an attorney, and a courtroom will accept it.
Thank you for your reply. This seems like a reasonable and logical answer but I can envision some potential problems with convincing insurance companies, government agencies such as police departments or courtroom officials to install specialized software on their computer systems. Partly, this may be due to security concerns but also simply because busy organizations may not want to bother or take the time.

I can speak from personal experience to a degree because of a situation I was involved in where I needed to submit a series of dash cam and CCTV videos to a law enforcement agency and a prosecutor's office due to a criminal matter. They refused to look at anything that needed to be downloaded from the internet or look at anything online that required clicking on a link, for example. They required me to submit everything on digital media so they could scan the files before allowing them into their computer systems. If a file was difficult to display or copy they didn't want to deal with it. (this happened with a CCTV file).

Another issue applies to both law enforcement as well as insurance companies. Often, when you submit a file for a criminal matter or an insurance claim it gets passed from one person to another as your matter is processed by their organization. In a criminal matter or a serious traffic accident, perhaps where there might have been a fatality, your video is legal evidence. As evidence, when a video gets handed from one person to another within an organization, the term applied is "chain of custody". I can see a situation where it would be unlikely that an organization like a police department or insurance company might be unwilling to install proprietary software on multiple computers to view original video from a single individual or perhaps a handful of individuals that happen to own a particular brand of dash cam.

I've commented along these lines many times before on this forum. If you want your legal or insurance matter to get proper attention, then you need to make it as idiot proof and as easy as possible for ANY person within the chain of custody of your dash cam video to view it. If it becomes too difficult, too time consuming, or too much of a hassle, a person responsible for dealing with your matter may simply move on to the next case.

As to whether the JDR file is viable and worthwhile I don't have an opinion at this point but I can see that its acceptance and adoption in the marketplace might face some challenges.
 
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Thank you for your reply. This seems like a reasonable and logical answer but I can envision some potential problems with convincing insurance companies, government agencies such as police departments or courtroom officials to install specialized software on their computer systems. Partly, this may be due to security concerns but also simply because busy organizations may not want to bother or take the time.

I can speak from personal experience to a degree because of a situation I was involved in where I needed to submit a series of dash cam and CCTV videos to a law enforcement agency and a prosecutor's office due to a criminal matter. They refused to look at anything that needed to be downloaded from the internet or look at anything online that required clicking on a link, for example. They required me to submit everything on digital media so they could scan the files before allowing them into their computer systems. If a file was difficult to display or copy they didn't want to deal with it. (this happened with a CCTV file).

Another issue applies to both law enforcement as well as insurance companies. Often, when you submit a file for a criminal matter or an insurance claim it gets passed from one person to another as your matter is processed by their organization. In a criminal matter or a serious traffic accident, perhaps where there might have been a fatality, your video is legal evidence. As evidence, when a video gets handed from one person to another within an organization, the term applied is "chain of custody". I can see a situation where it would be unlikely that an organization like a police department or insurance company might be unwilling to install proprietary software on multiple computers to view original video from a single individual or perhaps a handful of individuals that happen to own a particular brand of dash cam.

I've commented along these lines many times before on this forum. If you want your legal or insurance matter to get proper attention, then you need to make it as idiot proof and as easy as possible for ANY person within the chain of custody of your dash cam video to view it. If it becomes too difficult, too time consuming, or too much of a hassle, a person responsible for dealing with your matter may simply move on to the next case.

As to whether the JDR file is viable and worthwhile I don't have an opinion at this point but I can see that its acceptance and adoption in the marketplace might face some challenges.
Thanks for your explanation. It was quite helpful to understand the situation. The US is a big country and has many states so I think law enforcement in each state could have a different position on recording file form. For example, we are working with a buyer in the US. They are supplying dashcams to Taxi companies and they are using the JDR form. They are using the form for more than 10 years now. Taxi companies are always facing an accident. From time to time they have to submit a piece of evidence to a court. But we haven't received a complaint from the buyer and the buyer never received a claim from the taxi companies for the JDR form. JDR is a unique file system however MKV files also cannot be played by Windows Media Player without installing the codec. JDR form is probably inconvenient because a user needs its player. But the main reason why we use a dashcam is that we need evidence that proves the accident wasn't caused by the driver. JDR form protects data and it protects the driver's right. Anyhow, I appreciate your opinion. I will discuss with the tech team whether we can improve the current file system. :)
 

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Yes, Janus cam is our buyer and we provide the format to them. But I don't think the picture DRS-7000/DRS-8000 is Korean product. It's Japanese :)

That camera photo kept coming up when I searched for the term ".JDR file format". Well, that was why I tagged your name and said that you could tell us more. :)
 

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Thanks for your explanation. It was quite helpful to understand the situation. The US is a big country and has many states so I think law enforcement in each state could have a different position on recording file form. For example, we are working with a buyer in the US. They are supplying dashcams to Taxi companies and they are using the JDR form. They are using the form for more than 10 years now. Taxi companies are always facing an accident. From time to time they have to submit a piece of evidence to a court. But we haven't received a complaint from the buyer and the buyer never received a claim from the taxi companies for the JDR form. JDR is a unique file system however MKV files also cannot be played by Windows Media Player without installing the codec. JDR form is probably inconvenient because a user needs its player. But the main reason why we use a dashcam is that we need evidence that proves the accident wasn't caused by the driver. JDR form protects data and it protects the driver's right. Anyhow, I appreciate your opinion. I will discuss with the tech team whether we can improve the current file system. :)

It's interesting what you mentioned about working with MKV files in Windows Media Player if you installed the codec. Does that mean you could open .JDR files in Windows Media Player if the .JDR codec was available? Would that also be the case with a universal media player like VLC?
 

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I like the no-conversion aspect of cams using .ts as it eliminates last-file-corruption problems, but it is not a commonly used file format so as Dashmellow says it might be a problem when submitting evidence, especially in small towns with outdated computer resources. I positively would not have any proprietary file format in use no matter what it's features are. If you need compression, h.265 does pretty good and is becoming common, and h.264 is pretty much everywhere now.

Consumer cams are a different game from commercial cams. Companies tend to prefer integrated systems which are easy to set up and use as they don't want to have to train people to use it, nor do they want to add more work to their office. Plus they generally have either legal staff or a pre-selected Lawyer working for them. We consumers want to be able to use the systems we like or already have since we are familiar with them. We need something which any Lawyer can easily deal with as our legal costs are based on the time they must take to handle our cases.

I would highly recommend avoiding JDR file cams until such a time that it is in very common use, and I don't see that ever happening. Stay with a more common file format.

Phil
 

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I found out you can upload a .DAV file strait to youtube, but it is a bit buggy somehow, my PTZ camera while 1440p are not 50 or 60 FPS but on youtube they are 1440/50.
Alsop found potplayer play those just fine :)
So at least now i dont have to convert to a more normal format, which i use to do in the old days as far as i can recall.

As i said the JDR freak me out a little, and i am not sure i would spend my own hard earned pension on a camera that do that, but i am saying this from a standpoint of not having any personal experience or having much other experience to lean on.
It was also one of the reasons i tried to get a G-on camera to test when i was approached by gnet, and also the cloud stuff though i often advise against it, then it still stimulate the geek inside me.
But then corona came last year and my talks on E-mail with a guy named Martin Koo ended, and a camera never came to me, which are also alright i can not provide streamlined reviews published on a youtube channel with lots of followers, my reach to dashcam users and enthusiasts are solely on this forum.
Actually outside of youtube i dont do any form of social media.
 
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It's interesting what you mentioned about working with MKV files in Windows Media Player if you installed the codec. Does that mean you could open .JDR files in Windows Media Player if the .JDR codec was available? Would that also be the case with a universal media player like VLC?
Unfortunately, there is no universal media player that can play JDR file. I mentioned MKV and WMP to explain MKV also needs some step of works to see the video. Anyhow, my point is that if universal media player such as VLC, GOM include a codec that can decord JDF form in the future, it may be possible that you can play JDF file with universal media player.
 

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Unfortunately, there is no universal media player that can play JDR file. I mentioned MKV and WMP to explain MKV also needs some step of works to see the video.
not sure MKV was a great example, I don't recall any dashcam that uses MKV, majority are H.264 MP4 or MOV, some use AVI although most users don't like AVI either
 
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I like the no-conversion aspect of cams using .ts as it eliminates last-file-corruption problems, but it is not a commonly used file format so as Dashmellow says it might be a problem when submitting evidence, especially in small towns with outdated computer resources. I positively would not have any proprietary file format in use no matter what it's features are. If you need compression, h.265 does pretty good and is becoming common, and h.264 is pretty much everywhere now.

Consumer cams are a different game from commercial cams. Companies tend to prefer integrated systems which are easy to set up and use as they don't want to have to train people to use it, nor do they want to add more work to their office. Plus they generally have either legal staff or a pre-selected Lawyer working for them. We consumers want to be able to use the systems we like or already have since we are familiar with them. We need something which any Lawyer can easily deal with as our legal costs are based on the time they must take to handle our cases.

I would highly recommend avoiding JDR file cams until such a time that it is in very common use, and I don't see that ever happening. Stay with a more common file format.

Phil
I don't think that would be a problem because it can be converted to an MP4 file. Most of all, the dashcam we sell includes a viewer inside of the SD card. G-ON dash cameras are already using H265. So the compression rate is pretty good. One more good thing JDR file is that you can protect your data. If you delete some files accidentally, you can recover the data when you insert the SD card into your dashcam. The main reason why we use a dashcam is to see what happens after an event occurs. JDR files can protect the data. What a court to do normally is to figure out a fact. As long as you provide a piece of evidence, therefore, the court would not care about the type of file.
 

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Every court has to decide what evidence will be allowed, and any evidence which has been altered in any way can be excluded- and here in the US it usually is. Having to convert a video's format in order to present it as evidence can be argued to be such an alteration as it is no longer in it's original form. It is far better to not need such conversion which will reduce any chance of the evidence being brought into question.

I see nothing to be gained by using JDR format. If a person does not know how to not delete needed files they are not competent enough to be handling them to begin with. With the usual file formats being good enough for the job and already well-accepted there is no good reason to do things any other way.

Phil
 
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