Is there such a thing as a dashcam with a true Collision Avoidance System (CAS)?

Ralph2

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Though I dare say Crash avoidance probably comes with ABS and stability control ..
So which does the better job ? , the human or the computer ?
On ice (or gravel) without question the human. I would very much like a switch to turn off ABS as there are time when I would rather forgo steer-ability and take stop-ability. The trouble (in my opinion) is that ABS assumes all wheels have the same friction to the road, which may not be the case. You can have 3 wheels on dry pavement, one on ice and your braking ability is limited to the assumption all wheels are on ice... and you do not stop.
 

dash riposki

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I.. am just saying an alarm system that would warn with a beep or lights when there is a "warm" something ahead of you.... Could.. prevent you from running into a moose or the back of a truck in a snow storm.
Yes, no sense requiring a driver to actually pay attention. :)


The company I work for has collision avoidance systems in all the trucks. They still have to constantly remind the drivers that it isn't a 'radar' system that lets you continue to drive fast in poor visibility conditions. They do it anyway, and run into things.

:)

Driving a vehicle safely is not that difficult. Add too much electronic 'aids',and people get stupider.

i have a sibling who lives in an area with modest snow. He insists you have to have 4wd/AWD if you live there. Every time I visit him in the winter, I make sure I point out the SUV's in the ditch when it rains or snows even a little.
The vehicles are capable of handling the conditions. The drivers aren't.
 

David106

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On ice (or gravel) without question the human. I would very much like a switch to turn off ABS as there are time when I would rather forgo steer-ability and take stop-ability. The trouble (in my opinion) is that ABS assumes all wheels have the same friction to the road, which may not be the case. You can have 3 wheels on dry pavement, one on ice and your braking ability is limited to the assumption all wheels are on ice... and you do not stop.
I think you dong understand how and why an ABS system works the way it does. If you lock your wheels during braking and you are skiding then you are not stopping, with ABS the whole point is that you slow down the rotation of the wheels under braking without causing the wheels to lock up and skid.
 

DT MI

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...
So which does the better job ? , the human or the computer ?....
Based on my experience it's the computer, human comes in at a distant second. This is based on 'normal' street driving - not competitive or track driving. The electronics in my last 3 vehicles could detect wheel slip and apply correction before I was even aware of the condition.
 

DT MI

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...The trouble (in my opinion) is that ABS assumes all wheels have the same friction to the road, which may not be the case. You can have 3 wheels on dry pavement, one on ice and your braking ability is limited to the assumption all wheels are on ice... and you do not stop.
That has not been my experience at all. Stability control systems monitor each wheel independently and compensate appropriately - that's the only way they can work properly.
 

Ralph2

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I think you dong understand how and why an ABS system works the way it does. If you lock your wheels during braking and you are skiding then you are not stopping, with ABS the whole point is that you slow down the rotation of the wheels under braking without causing the wheels to lock up and skid.
That.. is the theory. The trouble is that if ONE wheel is slipping ABS applies its magic to ALL wheels and thus severely limiting the braking (stopping) ability of your vehicle. ABS is designed to keep the tires rotating to maintain steer-ability... not quickest stopping.
 

Ralph2

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That has not been my experience at all. Stability control systems monitor each wheel independently and compensate appropriately - that's the only way they can work properly.
Stability control and ABS are two different beasts. ABS in my vehicle applies its magic to all wheels even if only ONE would benefit from it.
 

old4570

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Just depends on the ABS system !
There are apparently 3 different systems ...
4 Wheels
Split between front and rear
and then independent ( called 4 channel ) , and each wheel is adjusted separately from the others ...

I guess the budget ABS would be the worst to have ..
 

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Based on my experience it's the computer, human comes in at a distant second. This is based on 'normal' street driving - not competitive or track driving. The electronics in my last 3 vehicles could detect wheel slip and apply correction before I was even aware of the condition.
Most racers I run with will disable traction control but leave abs engaged for track events. This is because there are situations on track where a little sliding is actually desirable, such as getting the car to rotate thru a turn. But abs is useful everywhere since there's pretty much NO scenario where completely locking the brakes is a good thing. Rally drivers still have the handbrake to lock the rears to start a slide, but on a paved circuit, that is never the fast way around so we don't do it.
 

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Just depends on the ABS system !
There are apparently 3 different systems ...
4 Wheels
Split between front and rear
and then independent ( called 4 channel ) , and each wheel is adjusted separately from the others ...

I guess the budget ABS would be the worst to have ..
My dad's old 1990 Toyota 4runner 2wd was the vehicle I learned to drive in snow and ice. It had abs, but only on the rear axle. Fronts could be locked up at will. I suppose it helped keep the tail in line in a panic stop on dry pavement but not much use anywhere else.

And I've driven plenty of vehicles where if it detects slippage on one wheel during braking, it starts pumping the brakes for all 4 wheels. One vehicle that really stood out in how bad is braking was, was a jaguar x type awd. That car sucked in pretty much every area except that the seats were comfortable. :p point being, you can't guess what kind of abs a car will have, even based on how expensive the car may be.
 

David106

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That.. is the theory. The trouble is that if ONE wheel is slipping ABS applies its magic to ALL wheels and thus severely limiting the braking (stopping) ability of your vehicle. ABS is designed to keep the tires rotating to maintain steer-ability... not quickest stopping.
On my Mercedes each wheel is individually monitored and controlled.
 

DT MI

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..The trouble is that if ONE wheel is slipping ABS applies its magic to ALL wheels and thus severely limiting the braking (stopping) ability of your vehicle....
Not true - at least not true in all cases.

Directly from the owner's manual of my car (emphasis is mine):

If driving safely on a wet road and it
becomes necessary to slam on the
brakes and continue braking to
avoid a sudden obstacle, a
computer senses that the wheels
are slowing down. If one of the

wheels is about to stop rolling, the
computer will separately work the
brakes at each wheel.
 

DT MI

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More than my wife thinks I need.
Most racers I run with will disable traction control but leave abs engaged for track events....
And I totally understand why, that's why I qualified my remarks to limit the scope to 'normal' street driving.
 

Gibson99

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And I totally understand why, that's why I qualified my remarks to limit the scope to 'normal' street driving.
Yes, and I expanded on it to clarify why race drivers might want to disable such systems since it might not be obvious to those who don't race.

Of course, my actual "race" car doesn't even have abs, nevermind spiffy stuff like traction control. :)
 

DT MI

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...
Of course, my actual "race" car doesn't even have abs, nevermind spiffy stuff like traction control. :)
Neither did my Triumph GT-6 MkIII - many, many years ago when I did stuff like that.
 
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