SG9665GC Install - 2014 Honda Ridgeline

ftpGuy

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Street Guardian SG9665GC
Finally got around to doing a hard wired install of my Street Guardian SG9665GC into a 2014 Honda Ridgeline. Easy install. I won't go into a step by step install as most members know the basics but will share a few photos along with some basic info pertaining to this particular install.

Initial testing looked okay though I did think it would be better. Going to adjust the lens down a notch on next test run.

The basic part list and where I purchased them from are...

Street Guardian SG9665GC

Cell Power CPUSB01 Mini USB Power Adapter

ATM Mini Blade Fuse Add-A-Circuit Fuse Holder (add your own fuse)

Dashcam and GPS logger were mounted as shown below. Running the power adapter wires was easy on this vehicle. Unlike the old days, headliner pulls down. Simply tuck wires up between liner and vehicle roof.

Next, using dashcam supplied tool, pry the A-pillar slightly towards you allowing the cable to be tucked under and out of sight.



Lift up on the black rubber molding lip and slip your cable underneath. Repeat, rinse, repeat until you get near the fuse panel area. There you find a nice seam that you can easy tuck the cable in.



Used location #32 "ACC" which uses a 7.5 A fuse. (See your manual.) Remove the fuse. Easier to put fuses in the holder before putting back in fuse panel. Make sure the fuse you are adding for the dashcam is inline with the wire lead . The factory fuse goes in the other slot. This will allow the dashcam to turn on and off with the vehicle. 5A is usually fine for the dashcam. Again, search the forums for more info on fuse choices.



There is a cover on the drivers side of the dash shown in image #2 that can be removed which has a small bolt that can be used for a ground. Will take some patience to get wiring there while laying on the floor but works. Didn't see much else existing to use so that was the path I took. Will need to strip a few inches of the cable sleeve allowing you to split the wires allowing reach. The power adapter cord length is plenty long so no issues there.

Attach your Cell Power USB "hot" wire to the fuse holder (soldered connection with shrink tubing is best IMO). Using cable, zip ties or other methods, tidy up your wires/cable making sure they are securely tucked away as to not impair driving. Connect dash cam. Start vehicle. Should be good.



Please see the below images for dashcam and GPS logger placement. In this case, the logger was "flipped." Search the forums for more details on this. From the drivers seat, I can see the dashcam power/record/mic lights and easy tap the "lock" button if wanted. While tight, have room to access the micro SD card. Removal of cam is a non issue. Plug and unplug wires BEFORE mounting or removing the cam.







This writeup may not be 100% correct in terms, spelling, or my approach to install. However, I do hope members find it of some value. Thank you for reading. :cool:
 

CCClarke

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Nice write-up and accompanying pictures. I routed my input cable to the DVR exactly as you described, but ran the input side of the cell power to the back of a 12v receptacle.

My DVR is located at the same height/distance from the headliners as yours. If you want to cover your cables/connectors using the supplied cable cover, you can cut it to fit flush against the headliner for a factory-installed look. The two pinch clips are more than sufficient to mate the cover halves securely.
 

Wytwolf

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I wish Honda had the civics use the more traditional wiper action like the ridgelines. Civic wipers clear in a scissor movement (arms attach at the corners of the windshield) instead of the normal wiping in unision. With the scissor action there is a triangle behind the rear view mirror that never gets cleared. Normal driving there is no issue but it does make placing a dashcam more challenging.
 

Mikk36

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Normally you have to peel back the rubber seal to remove the A-pillars, this also seems to be the case on your image.
Just noting this because you didn't seem to.

After peeling back the rubber seal (well, pulling it off actually, it goes back easily), you can completely remove the cover and route the cables as you like.
First video from Youtube, should be similar in all cars (well, it is exactly the same in my Toyota Avensis, for example).
 

CCClarke

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Anytime you start removing interior trim pieces, you run the risk of damaging something.

This DIY video is a cautionary example of how NOT to remove trim.

By pulling from the top, along the axis of the part, you increase the chances of distorting or even snapping the housings for the lower retaining clips. Many clips are pressed over plastic housings which can break when removed at even a slight angle.

Something else to consider is many A pillars contain air bags. At a minimum, The fuse should be removed to reduce the chances of the air bag being accidentally deployed.

Nylon trim tools, (avoid using a screwdriver, if it slips, it can score or cut into a part) are a much safer way to remove trim. By lifting an edge to get started, and prying beneath the outside edge directly outwards, the clips disengage straight out, rather than at an angle, in much the same way they were originally installed at the factory.

Just my .02, but visit a body shop or dealership where they do this type of work daily. They use specialized tools made for this very reason. They aren't expensive either-especially when compared to the price of a replacement trim piece.

Prying leather or fabric-covered trim pieces with your hands is ill-advised. The proper tools increase the likelihood of doing a good job -it's why they exist.
 
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